Past events

Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary ® presents

The Mark Pokras Lecture Series
with Norman Smith

Director of the Blue Hills Trailside Museum
and the Norman Smith Environmental Education Center

Snowy Owls to Saw-whet Owls

 

Saturday, December 2, 2017
2:00 PM

Tree Room, Trailhead House
Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary
690 Linden Street
Boylston, MA 01505

Since 1981, Norman Smith has spent countless days and nights, in every imaginable weather condition, observing, capturing, banding and relocating Snowy Owls at Logan International Airport. Data has been collected on roosting, hunting and behavior while on their wintering grounds. Since 2000 satellite transmitters have been attached to owls to learn more about their movements. Find out what has been learned to date, what questions remain and how this project developed to include research on Saw-whet Owls.

Norman Smith is a self-taught naturalist who has worked for the Massachusetts Audubon Society since 1974. His current position is Director of Blue Hills Trailside Museum and Norman Smith Environmental Education Center in Milton, Massachusetts.

Norman has studied birds of prey for over 35 years, including rehabilitating the injured and successfully fostering over 1,000 orphaned hawk and owl chicks into adoptive nests. His ongoing long-term projects include trapping and banding migrating hawks and owls in the Blue Hills Reservation, banding nestling hawks and owls, and doing research on snowy owls and other raptors wintering at Boston’s Logan International Airport. He has also traveled to Alaska to study snowy owls in their native tundra habitat. His research work has been published in National Geographic, National Wildlife, Ranger Rick, Yankee, Massachusetts Wildlife, Bird Observer, Birding, Sanctuary, Geo, Nature, Grolier Encyclopedia, Owls of the Northern Hemisphere and Owls of the World.

His mission is to use the information gathered from his research to stimulate a passion in everyone he meets to help us better understand, appreciate and care for this world in which we live.


 

Photo Ron McAdow

Quiet contemplation under the trees

On Saturday, November 18th, starting from 11am to 1pm, Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary will hold a quiet event in the Tree Room.

This event is designed for people who wish to set the world aside for an hour or two to be mindful in a quiet natural setting. This is an opportunity for people to reconnect with nature and reconnect with personal inner peace and wisdom. Registration is required.

All are welcome to take a space in the Tree Room for a period with no talking, and no cell phone or other electronics.

You are free to bring your own favorite book to read;

To open your notebook to write;

To do your own drawing;

To compose a poem of yours;

To meditate;

To embrace self-reflection;

To be acquainted with your own independence;

To acknowledge existence, self-awareness, and mindfulness;

To honor the healing force and the kindness on earth and in the wilderness;

To give peace a chance;

To allow your heart open to your prayers and to allow yourself to give thanks;

Or, to just sit quietly in front of the forest relax and breathe.

Afterward we will offer light refreshment and beverages in the Studio Room.


*** Announcement ***

As of Wednesday 10/4, this event has reached capacity

Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary ®

presents

Music in the Woods
with the Argus Quartet

Clara Kim,  violin
Jason Issokson, violin
Dana Kelley, viola
Joann Whang, cello

Quartet No. 64 in D Major, Op. 76, No 5, Hob.No. lll:79           Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)
I.    Allegretto
II.   Largo. Cantabile e mesto
III.  Menuetto. Allegro
IV.   Finale. Presto


Peculiar Strokes 
(2011)                                                                      Andrew Norman (b. 1979)


Quartet No.57 in C Major, Op. 74, No. 1, Hob. lll:72     
                                   Joseph Haydn
I.    Allegro moderato
II.   Andantino grazioso
III. Menuetto. Allegro
IV.  Finale. Allegretto

Sunday, October 15, 2017
3:00 PM

Tree Room, Trailhead House
Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary
690 Linden Street
Boylston, MA 01505

About the Quartet:

Founded in 2013 in Los Angeles, the Argus Quartet is dedicated to reinvigorating the audience-performer relationship through innovative concerts and diverse repertoire – connecting with and building up a community of engaged listeners is at the core of the quartet’s mission. The quartet also believes that today’s ensembles can honor the storied chamber music traditions of our past while forging a new path forward. In that spirit, their repertoire includes not just staples of the chamber music canon but also a large number of pieces by living composers.

From 2015-17 the quartet served as the Fellowship Quartet in Residence at the Yale School of Music and was the first ensemble to be mentored by the Brentano String Quartet in that capacity. In the fall of 2017, the Argus Quartet began an appointment as the Graduate Quartet in Residence at the Juilliard School, where they work closely with the Juilliard String Quartet – Argus will make their Lincoln Center recital debut with a performance at Alice Tully Hall in May of 2018.

About Peculiar Strokes:

“Writing a string quartet is a daunting task.  To write a quartet is to willingly put oneself in the ring with the big boys, and thus I have avoided it for as long as possible.   But I figured it was about time I gave the medium a try.

And what I tried to do was to write the most “un-quartety” quartet I could imagine.  Where so many quartets think big, with sprawling, formally complex movements and large-scale rhetorical arcs, mine aims small, with seven bite-size morsels of the blink-and-you-miss-them variety.   So many composers, from Haydn and Mozart forward, conceive of the medium as four equal voices asserting their independence through witty and learned dialogue; I tried to erase the individuality of the voices as much as I could, creating a “meta-instrument” out of the four musicians that thinks and plays as one.  And while so many quartets foreground the lyrical, linear, singing qualities of string instruments, I focused on their percussive possibilities.

I am an amateur violist, and while I’m not very good at making beautiful sounds on my instrument, I do love exploring wacky ways that the bow can make contact with the strings.  For me there is something magical about the wide range of sonic possibilities available through the manipulation of the smallest physical variables–the balance of weight in the fingers of the right hand, the placement of the bow a fraction of an inch closer or farther from the bridge.  Each of these small changes opens up a whole world of unique sounds, and each of the movements of this piece explores one of those worlds using a different, slightly peculiar, off-the-beaten-path bow stroke.”

– Andrew Norman


Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary ®

and the Berlin Public Library

present

Wingmasters: North American Birds of Prey

Saturday, September 30, 2017
12:30 PM
Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary
690 Linden Street
Boylston, MA 01505

* Seating is limited. Please register by calling the Berlin Public Library at 978-838-2812 *

Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary is a place of tranquility and self-reflection. It loves rocks, trees, and birds. In that loving, we find nourishment for our spirits and our souls. These forty-five acres of natural land are home to plants, streams, glacial boulders, and wild animals large and small.

The Berlin Public Library provides materials and services to support community residents in pursuit of their personal, recreational, educational and occupational interests. Special emphasis is placed on current popular materials in a variety of formats. The Library serves residents of all ages, recognizing that each group has its own distinct needs and interests: preschoolers, school-age children, teenagers, adults, and seniors. All staff are trained to assist you with reference questions, and to help you locate the materials you need.


The Thoreau Bicentennial Read
at Summer Star

*** Announcement ***

This event has been booked to full capacity 

This year is the 200th anniversary of one of the most important and influential American writers: Henry David Thoreau. Berlin Public Library and Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary jointly present a unique event —the Thoreau Bicentennial Read at Summer Star.

Attendees will have the opportunity to choose and read a favorite passage of Thoreau’s writing. Writer John Hanson Mitchell, co-host of the event, will give a talk about Thoreau’s influence on his life and his books, which include Living at the End of Time, John’s account of the two years he spent in a replica of Thoreau’s Walden Pond cabin. Honored Readers including Writer, Tracker, and Naturalist David Brown, MASS Audubon’s Naturalist Joe Choiniere, Berlin Library Director Bob Hodge, Writer and co-host Ron McAdow, and Summer Star Founder and Manager Shalin Liu will lead off the readings, followed by other participants. After listening together to Thoreau’s words we will discuss thoughts and feelings related to Thoreau, his work, and this celebration of his birthday.

Saturday, August 26, 2017
4:00PM
Trailhead House
Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary
690 Linden Street
Boylston, MA 01505

Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary is a place of tranquility and self-reflection. It loves rocks, trees, and birds. In that loving, we find nourishment for our spirits and our souls. These forty-five acres of natural land are home to plants, streams, glacial boulders, and wild animals large and small.

The Berlin Public Library provides materials and services to support community residents in pursuit of their personal, recreational, educational and occupational interests. Special emphasis is placed on current popular materials in a variety of formats. The Library serves residents of all ages, recognizing that each group has its own distinct needs and interests: preschoolers, school-age children, teenagers, adults, and seniors. All staff are trained to assist you with reference questions, and to help you locate the materials you need.


Summer StarSummer Star Wildlife Sanctuary Presents:


Exploring Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary and the Lives of Beavers

With

Assistant Director of Stewardship at Sudbury Valley Trustees,

Dan StimsonDan Stimson

July 9, 10am-12:30pm

Join us for a walk along the 1.5 miles of trails at Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary. We will discuss the habitats found at the Sanctuary, as well as the wildlife that call it home! We’ll take time to explore the beaver ponds found along Wrack Meadow Brook and talk about the ways in which beavers shape their environment, and how the changes they cause affect other wildlife species.

Free event, but registration is required. Email us at info@SummerStarWildlife.org Space is limited.

Ladt Slipper
Lady Slipper


Summer Star™ Linden Street Gallery presents:

“Bricolage”

\bre-ko-lazh, bri-\
Noun
Construction (as of art or literature) achieved by using whatever comes to hand

by Brenda Cirioni

March 4 through June 27, 2017
barn-series-blue-door
“Blue Door”

Artist statement: My art stems from growing up on a dead end dirt road surrounded by woods. There I experienced a deep connection with the natural world. Through mixed media painting I explore the tension between nature and the elements, destruction and regeneration, exuberance and impermanence. My art speaks about power, grace and transformation in a world of uncertainty.

The found materials in my paintings are a way to feed into this cycle of renewal. These bits of paper, wrappers, fabric, and various oddments allow me to give new life to trash that would otherwise be in a landfill. As in life, with each scrap I use – when it’s gone it’s gone.

My method of layering and juxtaposing disparate materials draws attention to the multiplicities and mysteries of nature and life.

old-tree-sm
“Old Tree”

Biography: Brenda Cirioni’s childhood shaped her worldview and her art. She came to understand the world by exploring the woods surrounding her home which was located at the end of a dirt road. Landscape is her subject matter, not to represent it but rather explore the feelings and emotions that come from being part of the natural world.

In 2012 an event triggered a memory of her home being destroyed by fire. A structure emerged in her paintings, sometimes licked by flames others engulfed in a raging fire.Viewing Cirioni’s barn paintings leaves one with a tug of incertitude–how can something so tragic also be seen as beautiful and breathtaking? Perhaps this is the exact emotion she is trying to convey. Cirioni wants us to see both the destruction and the regeneration, a celebration of nature’s insurmountable capabilities that will forever trump those of our own.

Cirioni has exhibited throughout the US. She currently has work in a traveling BYU exhibition Beyond Structure: Representations of the American Barn. She’s exhibited in Boston and Metro West galleries, Attleboro Arts Museum, Danforth Museum, deCordova Museum, Fitchburg Museum and the Berkshire Museum. Her work can be seen at Renjeau Gallery, Natick, MA, Three Stones Gallery in Concord, MA, Fountain Street Fine Art, Framingham, MA Gallery North Star in Grafton, Vermont and Portland Art Gallery, Portland ME.

Her work is in corporate collections at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Fidelity Investments and Carroon and Black Insurance Co. in Boston, as well as other institutions and private collections across the country, including the Wrigley family collection. Cirioni’s painting Dickinson’s Hope hung in the office of Governor Deval Patrick. And now resides in his collection.

Cirioni graduated from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.


Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary presents

Music in the Woods

With

Parker Quartet

Tree Room at Summer Star

Sunday, April 30th, 2017, 4pm

Quartet No. 1 in E flat Major, Op. 12,      Felix Mendelssohn

Quartet No. 2 in C Major,                             Benjamin Britten

parkerquartet

Daniel Chong, violin

Ying Xue, violin

Jessica Bodner, viola

Kee-Hyun Kim, Cello

Free event, but registration is required. Email us at info@SummerStarWildlife.org  Space is limited.


Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary Presents

Mark Pokras Lecture Series

Creature Conserve: Art, Science, and Saving Species
Dr. Lucy Spelman

And

Conservation Medicine in Ecuador
Nikki Becich, V’18

Saturday, April 29th, 2017 11am

Lucy SpelmanNicole Becich

Program:

Art, Science, and Saving Species: Bringing artists and scientists together to foster sustained and informed support for animal conservation 

The world of animals as we know it is disappearing. Science tells us the animal kingdom cannot survive our massive presence on earth—unless we intervene. It also predicts a ripple effect on human health and society: we rely on animals for food, trade, shelter, sport, companionship, medicine, and spirituality. Art deepens our understanding of this interdependency; it helps us explore how we feel about animals and our relationships with them. Yet our response to the problem of species loss has fallen short. Scientific data and artistic expression, presented separately, have not had their intended impact. One solution is to combine these age-old practices. Together, art and science reach a wider audience. Science provides the road map; art motivates people to follow it. In this presentation, Dr. Spelman shares examples of artwork made by her RISD students and describes projects currently supported by Creature Conserve, including a traveling exhibition on the global wildlife trade. She shows us that artists have always been interpreters of our time. Through their eyes, the science of saving species and the importance of taking a one-health approach to conservation becomes accessible, meaningful, and relevant— and, the source of positive change.

Conservation Medicine in Ecuador: Protecting Species in One of the Most Diverse Countries on Earth

Through the National Aviary, Nikki has been afforded several unique job opportunities in zoo medicine and wildlife rehabilitation across Latin America. She will be speaking about efforts to protect native species in Ecuador, such as the Andean Condor, endangered amphibian and reptile conservation, as well as international species protection laws and the impact and scope of habitat destruction and wildlife trafficking abroad.

Speaker Biographies: Lucy H. Spelman, DVM, Dipl ACZM

Dr. Lucy Spelman is a board-certified zoo and wildlife veterinarian working to bring artists and scientists together to save species. Animals have always been part of her life. Her patients have included giant pandas in China, giant otters in Guyana, and mountain gorillas in central Africa. She has been exploring the interface between art, science, and one-health medicine since 2010 when she began teaching biology to students at the Rhode Island School of Design. In 2015, she founded the non-profit, Creature Conserve and gave a TEDx Talk “Art Can Save a Panda” in which she makes a case for greater public engagement in conservation through visual art. She is the author of various scientific articles and two popular books: the National Geographic Animal Encyclopedia and The Rhino with Glue-on Shoes. Dr. Spelman currently practices at Ocean State Veterinary Specialists and teaches at RISD. She has an undergraduate degree in biology from Brown University and a doctoral degree in veterinary medicine from the University of California at Davis. In 1994, she became the 43rd member of the American College of Zoological Medicine, the first to achieve this milestone right out of residency training. Her work experience includes zoo, wildlife, and small animal medicine; public speaking; writing; teaching; zoo administration—she served as the first female Director of the Smithsonian’s National Zoo from 2000-2005; and, conservation—she was the Field Manager for the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project from 2006-2009.

In addition to her work with Creature Conserve, she serves on the boards of three other non-profits, Wildlife Rehabilitators Association of Rhode Island, Foster Parrots, and Karanambu Trust.

Nikki Becich, V’18

Nikki Becich is a third year vet student at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. She is a graduate of Pomona College in Claremont, CA, where she first began studying tropical ecology and conservation biology. Nikki, who loves birds, has been fortunate enough to work closely with the Association of Zoos and Aquarium accredited National Aviary in her hometown of Pittsburgh, PA. They have ongoing efforts to find, partner with, and support organizations doing in-situ habitat conservation in Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Peru, Brazil, and Ecuador, among other countries.

Free event, but registration is required. Email us at info@SummerStarWildlife.org  Space is limited.

SUMMER STAR WILDLIFE SANCTUARY

Trail Walk Series presents

ECO-TRACKING AT SUMMER STAR with DAVID BROWN
SATURDAY, JANUARY 28, 2017, 12 to 3 pm

UPDATE: This program has reached full capacity.

David Brown Tracking

Summer Star is extremely fortunate to enlist the services of David Brown to provide a three hour combined indoor/outdoor eco-tracking program at the sanctuary. With his guidance, participants will see that many of our resident animals remain busy through the winter months. Participants are encouraged to check the temperature forecast. Dressing in layers is usually a safe bet.

Bio: David Brown

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Tracker-naturalist David Brown has offered interpretive programs for over 20 years to many public and private groups in New England. He practices “quiet activism” believing that a people don’t need to be convinced to protect what they love. His task is to help them love nature by helping them to see some of the life hidden from direct view by foliage and the night. He is the author of several publications on the art of animal tracking, including The Next Step: Interpreting Animal Tracks, Trails and Sign, recently released by McDonald & Woodward Publishing Company.

Eco-tracking at Summer Star

We will take a roughly two-hour walk at Summer Star Sanctuary practicing the arts of finding and identifying the tracks, trails and other sign of wild animals that make the pine-oak forest their home. Some of this sign, such as tracks in the snow, is obvious; other evidence hides in plain sight and needs to be pulled out of the background to be identified. Along the way we will try to answer the questions: why was the detected animal here and what was it doing? That is, what was its relationship with the habitat in which it was found? This is “eco-tracking” or ecological animal tracking. The indoor component of the program will include a slide show and track casts.

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David Brown points out bobcat tracks in porcupine trail.

Trail Walk at Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary
Date: Saturday, January 28, 2017     Time: 12- 3 pm

Make up date (in event of poor weather): Sunday, January 29. 12-3pm.

UPDATE: This program has reached full capacity.


Summer Star™ Linden Street Gallery presents:

“Memory of Nature”

By Terry Gips

BIOGRAPHY

For Terry Gips, subject matter and concept are more important than choice of media, although she often uses photography in one way or another. Landscapes of intersections between land and water and those that compare nature’s organic chaos with human imposed order are common themes in her work.

Gips has had strong connections to nature throughout her life. She was raised on
a dairy farm and spent a decade living off the grid in Vermont where she and her husband grew most of their food and raised sheep and chickens. She is no stranger to science and technology, however. Her primary art medium—photography—relies on light, camera mechanics and chemistry or digital processing. Her graduate work at Yale in architecture and with photographers Walker Evans and Paul Caponigro kindled her interest in the ways humankind has interacted with nature for shelter, sustenance and pleasure. Her computer uency originated in the late 1960’s, and blossomed when she embraced digital technology for art-making while teaching and serving as director of the museum at the University of Maryland College Park in the 1980’s and 90’s. Previous to moving to Maryland, Gips taught at Colgate University, Goddard College and the University of Vermont.

Gips has exhibited throughout the US and in China, Germany, and Poland. Her work is in collections at the National Museum of American Art and the National Women’s Museum in Washington as well as in public and private collections. Gips has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Fine Arts Sea Grant program at the University of Rhode Island. She was awarded residencies at Light Work Gallery in Syracuse, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and C-Scape Dune Shack on Cape Cod. Gips lived on the Cape from 2000 to 2016 and made the adjacent waters the focus of her art and volunteer work. She and her husband relocated to New Bedford in 2016.

Memory of Nature

ARTIST STATEMENT

Memory and nature have repeatedly appeared in my work over the years. Nature’s tangled and branching forms in the Memory of Nature project mirror the highly complex webs of memories as well as the physical brain itself. I’m interested in
how the brain enables us to “see,” establish memories, retrieve them or not, and understand our worlds. Being in touch (both literally and metaphorically) with our environment and expressing that encounter visually, enriches our knowledge and connections. Making images reinforces the mental imprint called memory which,
in turn, is an integral part of knowledge. This integrative process of seeing, touching, making, and remembering is not unlike the ancient Greek and Roman mnemonic process of constructing “memory palaces” of speci c things and locations in order to facilitate remembering. Now in the 21st century, as technology disturbs and usurps much of this human work, I nd it is more important than ever to explore the relationship between nature and memory.

An important part of my work is the process of searching for and collecting of natural materials. I look for items that are more or less familiar but dif cult to parse due to their complexity and small scale, and because they are hidden underground, under water, or in a jumbled mess. The original specimens–roots, seaweed, a wad of wool eece from a sheep, a bird’s nest–are usually smaller than my hand: when highly enlarged, every tiny root, stem, leaf, grain of sand, or strand of entangled shing line becomes vividly clear–so “real” as to seem unreal at times. Sometimes I create an overlying grid by framing segments of the large image, helping my eye come to terms with the chaos and elegant wildness of nature.

“Memory Of Nature” will be on display from July 30th until November 29th, 2016.


IMG_0667

Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary

Presents

Music in the Woods

The Julius Quartet

Hyun Jeong Lee, violin

David Do, violin

John Batchelder, viola

Byron Hogan, cello

and

Marc Ryser, piano

Sunday, October 30, 2016

2:00 pm

Tree Room

The Trailhead House

PROGRAM

String Quartet No. 14 in D Minor  D.810 “Death and the Maiden”

Franz Schubert  (1797 – 1828)

Piano Quintet in E-flat Major, Op. 44

Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856)

The Julius Quartet was formed in the fall of 2012 at the Boston Conservatory, and has served as the Conservatory’s Honors Quartet. Participating in BOCO’s annual Contemporary Music Festival, the Quartet also concertizes and does outreach throughout the United States and Canada. In the fall of 2015 the Quartet became the Graduate Quartet in Residence at Montclair State University, and gave its Carnegie Hall debut in March 2016.

Concerts at Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary are curated by Stephanie Woolf.

690 Linden Street

Boylston MA 01505

Free event, but registration is required. Email us at info@SummerStarWildlife.org or call 508-869-3434 between the hours of 11am and 3pm, Saturday – Tuesday. Space is limited.


Mark Pokras Lecture Series

The Sea Turtles of New England with Dr. Charlie Innis

Threats to Aquatic Ecosystems with Eric Littman

11am-1:30pm, Saturday October 22, 2016.

Speaker Biographies:

Dr. Charlie Innis

Dr. Innis received his bachelor’s degree in biology from Cornell University in 1990, and his doctorate in veterinary medicine from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine in 1994. He was in private practice working with small animals and exotic animals from 1995-2005, and has been working full time at New England Aquarium since 2005, where he is currently the Director of Animal Health. He holds adjunct teaching positions at Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Connecticut, and Mount Ida College. Dr. Innis is a member of the IUCN Tortoise and Freshwater Turtle Specialist Group, the IUCN Marine Turtle Specialist Group, and is Past President of the Association of Reptilian and Amphibian Veterinarians. He has published numerous scientific articles and several textbook chapters on the medical and surgical management of reptiles, and has been an invited speaker at national and international veterinary conferences. He is regularly solicited to provide peer review for scientific publications involving veterinary management and conservation of reptiles. In 2011, Dr. Innis became one of the first veterinarians in the United States to be recognized as a reptile and amphibian specialist by the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners.

Eric Littman

Eric is a fourth year veterinary student at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University. While pursuing his undergraduate degree at University of Hawaii, Eric assisted in a graduate marine mammal research lab (on projects such as Humpback whale social sound investigation and auditory research in Atlantic bottlenose dolphins and False Killer whales) and completed his thesis on interactions between native and invasive mantis shrimp. Prior to veterinary school, he worked in the marine animal training and husbandry field, working with dolphins, seals, sea lions and penguins. Last summer, Eric was awarded a research fellowship, which he used to conduct research on sea stars of the Pacific northwest undergoing wasting disease. He recently contributed to a summit discussing the future of sea star wasting disease, in which he presented his research on the use of a few diagnostic imaging modalities in sea stars to leading scientists studying the Pacific coast mortality event. Eric is married to his wife, Kacey, and has a dog, a hedgehog, and two sugar gliders. In his free time, he enjoys photography, hiking, rock climbing, playing the ukulele and snorkeling.

More info available here.

Free event, but registration is required. Email us at info@SummerStarWildlife.org or call 508-869-3434 between the hours of 11am and 3pm, Saturday – Tuesday. Space is limited.


Summer Star 7-16

PDF


Summer Birds at Summer Star

Sunday, July 17, 8-11am.

For songbirds the antics of spring are over as is the quiet period of incubation. As the nestlings fledge, a new period of intense activity begins as parents actively search for insects and caterpillars to feed their young. Join naturalist David Brown for a two-hour walk in the Summer Star sanctuary looking for birds and listening for their songs. Bring binoculars and bug repellent, and wear rugged shoes for trail walking. The walk will be followed by a slide/video presentation on summer birds.

Bio: David Brown

Tracker-naturalist David Brown has offered interpretive programs for over 20 years to many public and private groups in New England. He practices “quiet activism” believing that a people don’t need to be convinced to protect what they love. His task is to help them love nature by helping them to see some of the life hidden from direct view by foliage and the night. He is the author of several publications on the art of animal tracking, including The Next Step: Interpreting Animal Tracks, Trails and Sign, recently released by McDonald & Woodward Publishing Company.

Ovenbird singing Warwick May
Ovenbird singing

Date: Sunday, July 17, 2016     Time: 8am- 11 am

Free event, but registration is required. Email us at info@SummerStarWildlife.org or call 508-869-3434 between the hours of 11am and 3pm, Saturday – Tuesday. Space is limited.


Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary’s Linden Street Gallery Presents:

“Charged”

By Robin Remick

On display from March 26 until July 10.

Robin Remick

Artist statement

Growth of form weaves through my paintings. Characteristics of the environment, such as patterns created through natural shadows, reflections of light on water, or rock formations all inspire me.   I listen closely to my intuition to guide my decision making.  Paired with randomness and chance, my gut is the best barometer to keep my work fresh.  Although I take a multitude of photographs when I spend time in nature I seldom look at them for direction. Somehow the act of focusing in on a subject is enough to file in my memory to be reinterpreted later at my easel. The pull of gravity is present in all of my paintings. It gives a movement to my work, and an indicator of passage of time.

Thin layers of transparent oil are built up, much like working with watercolor. The paintings selected for Charged have been created through a process of masking, similar to a silk screen technique. This style creates a defined edge and allows me to blend colors. The overlapping forms that develop give my work a charged energy, while keeping the repose of a restful visual arrangement.

Biography

I am a transplanted Midwesterner, raised in northern Minnesota on the shores of Lake Superior. In 2005 I received my masters of fine arts degree in painting from Eastern Michigan University. I studied under Professor Barry Avedon, a legendary painting instructor of 43 years.  Upon graduation I set up a nonprofit art gallery run by volunteers in an art center near the university. The gallery offered rotating exhibits for local artists and schools. My husband and I raised our three children in Ann Arbor Michigan and moved to Wellesley in 2007. I paint in my studio in Framingham daily and I am represented by Powers Gallery in Acton Massachusetts as well as art consultants in the Boston area and in Naples Florida.

My earliest memories are time spent in nature, making mud pies sandwiched between large green leaves, or picking wild flower bouquets for my mother. As a young adult I enjoyed canoe trips in Minnesota, portaging into wilderness lakes in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area. Now my husband and I spend our free time in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, hiking or kayaking on the quiet waters of the area. Nature’s beauty inspires my paintings.


Summer Star Nature Talk.png


 Update: Concert has reached full capacity.

Summer Star Spring Concert


Nature Walk at Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary

Led by Dan Stimson of Sudbury Valley Trustees

Date: Sunday April 10, 2016, 10am-12 noon

Dan
Dan Stimson serves as Assistant Director of Stewardship at SVT.

In the heart of Sudbury Valley Trustees’ Tri-Town Landscape Protection Project lies the Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary, 45 acres of forest, streams and wetlands. Join us for a tour of these habitats along Summer Star’s trails. We’ll highlight historic land use features and talk about the species that call Summer Star home. We’ll also take a special detour off trail to see newly formed beaver dams, lodges, and ponds. Learn about the lives of beavers and other local wildlife that they benefit. You’ll also hear how you can help SVT to ensure the protection of wildlife habitat in this special area.

This event is free to the public, but registration is required. Register by emailing us at info@SummerStarWildlife.org or by calling us at 508-869-3434 between the hours of 11am and 3pm, from Saturday to Tuesday.

Photo 1 20151219_Beaver Lodge_Wilson Acuna
Beaver lodge photographed by Wilson Acuna.

Growing Up Wild

Professional Development Workshop

At Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary

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Come check out our latest exhibit, “Potters In The Woods,” on display from October 17th until February 16th.

About the artists:

Chiyoko Lee

Ever since I touched my first clay, I was amused by its versatile nature I was captivated by its texture, pliability, and the magic of earth and fire All I wished was to see how much I can contribute to that process Each clay body has its own language Learning the language gives me a tool to examine, explore, and express my voice in my clay work.

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The majority of my work is functional ware As different food chooses different kind of dishes, I work with different clay and different methods I like the delicious smooth touch of porcelain and its delicate clean result Yet, I also love the earthy grounded look of stoneware I hand build my pieces as well as throw them on the wheel Both are equally part of everyday living.

I approach my work with harmony in mind I like to make spontaneous fluid lines in my forms and decorations After I throw or hand build my piece, I decorate the surface with slip work, texture, carving, stamping or roping In the result, I would like to convey harmony, calmness, relaxation, and also a playful whimsical aspect in my work.

Japanese influence is an obvious element in my work in both the conscious level and subconscious level Working in clay expands my interest in nature I learn to see landscapes, plants, rocks, flowers, water and old architecture with a new curiosity and reflect it in my work.

Food and food presentation is a way of life Flowers and vases should complement each other Garden ornaments create harmony, tranquility and curiosity in the viewer’s soul In functional ware, you have a very intimate relationship It should function well, be pleasing to your eyes and to your touch, as well as being supportive to its function Such a piece will be a companion to you for a long time and every time you touch the pottery, you remember conversation shared with your family and friends over that plate of meal or cup of tea That is a treasure you have I hope my work gets one step closer to that goal

-Chiyoko Lee

Andrea Brown

Somewhere in my memory an image of a poster lives, perhaps on my junior high or high school art room wall. Or in a studio at my community college in Bellevue, WA. There I studied with my early mentor, Ray Jensen, Pacific Northwest steel and bronze sculptor. The image on the poster was of a white stoneware bottle, simple, minimal—deeply carved into upright ridges and furrows around the body. I must have gazed on that image repeatedly, for it has bubbled up now from my subconscious, perhaps even visiting, unbeknownst, while welding. When I moved to Boston to study sculpture at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, I left behind a love for clay vessels and seven years practice on the potters’ wheel. I took classes in life drawing and sculpting, welding, photography, and art history.

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For 20 years I pursued nature-under-the-microscope and figure inspired forms in my Rugg Road studio in Allston, MA. A main thread in my studies developed into using thin, square rods of mild steel. I built forms the way one builds marks up on paper, to define volume, to draw linear forms in space. The ultimate example of this style is the hanging piece here in the Linden Street Gallery.

My art making was interrupted in 2006. On Dec. 29th, at three o’clock in the morning I woke to shouts, feet pounding in the halls and flashing lights. A fire had broken out on an upper floor. With a cat under each arm I exited the building. In one night we all lost our homes and studios and gained a more personal sense of the individual losses and disruption.

The following were years of disruption. In an effort to get back on track, all the while moving around for work, I lay the ground for a new venture. I resettled in Boston in 2010. “Grad school” was a start-up vegan-with-organic cookie business.

Perhaps doomed to failure, as my main interest was educating about the positive environmental impact of organic agriculture and vegan/vegetarian diets, I closed the business as 2014 opened. I took a pottery course as an antidote to my despair. It was something I knew how to do.

As soon as I got my hands in the clay, I felt like I had come home. As my first mugs came out of the kiln last March, I realized I was a potter. There is something so gratifying about making vessels for eating and drinking, for showing off some garden flowers or for any other reason. Soon after, Fire Garden Pottery was born. The work you see here represents the best of the past two years and my return to create via handmade objects. Reconnecting with pottery and the potters wheel has also given me a new perspective on my past work, as I look again on the steel sculptures. In more ways than one my life seems to have “come full circle.” I am grateful for second and third chances and thankful to Summer Star for this opportunity to share with you my work.

-Andrea Brown

Photos courtesy of the artists.


UPDATE: The January 3rd eco-tracking program is at full capacity.

SUMMER STAR WILDLIFE SANCTUARY

Trail Walk Series presents

ECO-TRACKING AT SUMMER STAR with DAVID BROWN
SUNDAY, JANUARY 3, 2016, 1 to 3 pm

David Brown Tracking

Summer Star is extremely fortunate to enlist the services of David Brown to provide a two hour eco-tracking program at the sanctuary. With his guidance, participants will see that many of our resident animals remain busy through the winter months. Participants are encouraged to check the temperature forecast. Dressing in layers is usually a safe bet.

Bio: David Brown

Tracker-naturalist David Brown has offered interpretive programs for over 20 years to many public and private groups in New England. He practices “quiet activism” believing that a people don’t need to be convinced to protect what they love. His task is to help them love nature by helping them to see some of the life hidden from direct view by foliage and the night. He is the author of several publications on the art of animal tracking, including The Next Step: Interpreting Animal Tracks, Trails and Sign, recently released by McDonald & Woodward Publishing Company.

Eco-tracking at Summer Star

We will take a two-hour walk at Summer Star Sanctuary practicing the arts of finding and identifying the tracks, trails and other sign of wild animals that make the pine-oak forest their home. Some of this sign, such as tracks in the snow, is obvious; other evidence hides in plain sight and needs to be pulled out of the background to be identified. Along the way we will try to answer the questions: why was the detected animal here and what was it doing? That is, what was its relationship with the habitat in which it was found? This is “eco-tracking” or ecological animal tracking.

Trail Walk at Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary
Date: Sunday, January 3, 2016     Time: 1- 3 pm

Free event, but registration is required. Email us at info@SummerStarWildlife.org or call 508-869-3434 between the hours of 11am and 3pm, Saturday – Tuesday. Space is limited.

Make up date (in the case of zero snow cover): Sunday, January 31. 1-3pm.

Tracking At Summer Star


Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary’s Nature Talk Series presents:

Healing Wildlife

A lecture by Maureen Murray and Mariah Lancaster
Sunday, Dec 6, 2015, 11 am.

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Abstract: Wildlife encounters numerous challenges in the human-dominated landscape of the modern world. The Wildlife Clinic at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University treats over 2,000 injured wild animals each year. Most of these injuries result from interactions between wildlife and humans. This talk will discuss the process of treating and releasing injured animals back into their native habitats and the importance of maintaining the health of the environments in which these animals live. Learn how you can help to protect wildlife by developing an awareness of the threats facing these animals.

Bio: Maureen Murray, DVM, DABVP, is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Wildlife Medicine at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University. She is a board certified specialist in avian medicine and her research interest is in investigating the effects of rodent poisons on birds of prey.

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Maureen Murray releasing a rehabilitated Snowy Owl

Bio: Mariah Lancaster is a third year student in the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine class of 2017. She received her B.S. in Pre-Veterinary Medicine from University of Massachusetts Amherst and circumnavigated the globe on the fall 2010 voyage of Semester at Sea. She combines her passion for endangered species preservation and love of travel into intensive care of wildlife in crisis, with a special interest in animals rescued from the international wildlife trade. She has volunteered in wildlife rehabilitation in Central America and most recently was sponsored by the Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary to aid in the efforts of the Philippine Forest Turtle crisis. During the school year, she works in the Tufts Wildlife Clinic and is a president emerita of the Veterinarians for Global Solutions club.

Abstract: A Turtle Disaster. A firsthand account of reptile rehabilitation, this talk will focus on the Philippine Forest Turtle crisis that arose this past summer on their native island of Palawan. We will also touch on the history of the Southeast Asian turtle market, while discussing the scope and contributing factors to the illegal trade driving these species toward extinction.

This event will be free to the public upon registration. Refreshments will be provided.

To register for this event, email us at info@SummerStarWildlife.org or call 508-869-3434 between the hours of 11am and 3pm, Saturday – Tuesday.

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LINDEN STREET GALLERY

SUMMER STAR WILDLIFE SANCTUARY PRESENTS:

WILSON ANDRES ACUÑA

Connections: Paper Sculpture Arthropods
August 29 – October 13, 2015

wilson1Wilson Andres Acuna 1

690 LINDEN STREET
BOYLSTON, MA 01505
info@summerstarwildlife.org
508-869-3434

GALLERY OPEN HOURS: SATURDAY- TUESDAY, 11AM-3PM
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary is a place of tranquility and self-reflection. It loves rocks, trees, and birds. In that loving, we find nourishment for our spirits and our souls. These forty-five acres of natural land are home to plants, streams, glacial boulders, and wild animals large and small.

About the Artist:

Wilson Andres Acuña was born and raised in Colombia, where he lived until the age of seventeen. His artistic inclination emerged early on, and by the time he was five years old, his favorite activity was making miniature sculptures out of modeling clay. The inspiration of Wilson’s creations has always been his undying passion and love of nature, as reflected by his choice of subjects, which are almost invariably animals. In 2006 he moved to the United States to live with his father. For five years he resided in New York City, where he worked as a professional pet groomer and obtained his Associate degree in Science from the Borough of Manhattan Community College. During the summer of 2010, while working as a research intern at Tufts University’s Biology Department, Wilson started experimenting with paper tissue as a medium for artistic expression. In the fall of 2012, while Wilson was pursuing an undergraduate degree at Tufts in Biology and Environmental Studies, the Tower Gallery, at Tufts’ Tisch Library, showcased “A living world out of paper tissue,” Wilson’s first art show displaying his paper creations.  In the spring of 2014 he began work as a Natural History Guide with the Massachusetts Audubon Society.  In late summer of 2014, he opened his second art show as part of the annual Barbara J. Walker Butterfly Festival at Mass Audubon’s Broad Meadow Brook Wildlife Sanctuary. Later that year, Wilson became a member of the Visitor Services staff at Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary in Boylston, Massachusetts, where he continues to work today.


Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary “Music In The Woods” presents Premiere of The Julius Quartet from Boston Conservatory

IMG_0667 IMG_0676Above photos taken by Liam Hart, Summer Star Wildlife staffer.

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LINDEN STREET GALLERY
SUMMER STAR WILDLIFE SANCTUARY PRESENTS:

UntitledELEMENTS, Paintings by George Herman

Boylston, MA— The Linden Street Gallery at Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary presents the exhibit Elements, paintings by George Herman. This exhibit will open on June 6, 2015 and will be on view until August 25, 2015.

Herman’s paintings represent the elements seen and experienced in one’s everyday life….a walk in the woods, the home, the dog, the sky, the passing view from a speeding train, but presented through Herman’s unique painting process: multiple layers of painting and pouring, scraping and sanding, replicating the process of growth, destruction, decay and rebirth that exists in the natural world. With depth of feeling and vision, the image gradually emerges, and is seen as if for the first time.

The mission of the Linden Street Gallery is to instill an appreciation for the reflective and contemplative experiences of nature by engaging its visitors through gallery exhibitions, talks by artists, and other dynamic programming. The gallery nourishes the spirit by celebrating the interdependencies between humans and the natural environment.

Nestled in forty-five acres of forest, the Linden Street Gallery is located within the LEED Gold Trailhead House of the recently
opened Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary at 690 Linden Street, Boylston, Massachusetts. The wildlife sanctuary features wetland and woodland habitats that provide homes for wildlife and includes a 1.5-mile trail loop for outdoor exploration. The sanctuary honors nature through wildlife protection, art exhibitions focusing on nature, outdoor tours, educational programs, and wildlife releases in collaboration with the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University. The Linden Street Gallery within the Trailhead House at Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary is open Saturday through Tuesday 11:00 am–3:00 pm. The sanctuary’s trails are open dawn to dusk Saturday through Tuesday for humans and 24/7 for wildlife. Limited parking is available at Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary during the hours trails are open. Admission to Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary is free.

UPDATE: This gallery was recently featured in the Worcester Telegram, available here: http://www.telegram.com/article/20150613/NEWS/150619814

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Nature Walk SeriesNature Walk with Dan Stimson of SVT

JUNE 20, 2015, Saturday, 10 am to 12 noon

And tour of Trailhead House after the nature walk

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 Please click the link below for more information

Dan Stimson-Nature Walk

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Nature Walk SeriesNative Herbalism Workshop with Tommy Priester

May 30th 2015

Saturday, 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM

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  Tommy Priester, a practicing herbalist since 1998, combines extensive knowledge of Western herbalism, nutrition and diet with ancient wisdom traditions from Native American and other cultures. Tommy has a clinical practice, leads workshops and seminars and is a faculty member at The Boston School of Herbal Studies.

The workshop will begin with a Native based ceremony and will continue with a live plant walk on the grounds of Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary. The workshop is 3 hours long, with a break for lunch.

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May-9-Website Image-1SUMMER STAR WILDLIFE SANCTUARY PRESENTS TRAIL WALK SERIES
READING THE FOREST with Mike Crowley

Saturday, May 9th 2015

9:30am to 12:30pm

Reading the Forest

Join us for a hike around the Summer Star Wildlife sanctuary. Learn how to read the forest using patterns in the trees and the landscape. We will discuss the history of the land from a Native American hunting ground to the agricultural landscape of the 1800 to present day. This three hour hike will take us around the sanctuary trails through multiple types of forests in the peak wildflower season.

Call to register while space is available.

Call 508-869-3434 or email info@summerstarwildlife.org

SUMMER STAR WILDLIFE SANCTUARY

690 Linden Street, Boylston, MA 01505

508-869-3434

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Eagle One March 28

The Linden Street Gallery at Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary presents “Malcolm Wells: Earth-Sheltered Architecture.”  March 1–May 26, 2015

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Please see the Malcolm Wells Press Release

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The Summer Star Nature Talk Series presents, “Tending and Mending the Wild” with Dr. Mark Pokras

DATE: Saturday, December 6th at 5pmsalamander-better

PLACE: Summer Star Wildlife Sanctuary

Tree Room in the Trailhead House

690 Linden Street

Boylston, MA 01505

 

SPEAKER: Mark A. Pokras, DVM, Wildlife Clinic and Center for Conservation Medicine, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University

In 1983 the Cummings School of Veterinarian Medicine at Tufts University opened its Wildlife Clinic. Since then our students and faculty have been involved caring for sick and injured wildlife from all around New England and have been actively involved in regional conservation efforts.

In this presentation, Dr. Pokras will discuss some of the fascinating wildlife cases that the Wildlife Clinic has cared for, talk about the roles that Veterinarian can play in conservation, and emphasize the important roles that all of us can play in helping our native wildlife and conserving natural resources.         

One comment

  1. I would like to extend a thank you for allowing me to share my spirit flute music with you. I look forward to my next visit. Thank you again. Jim

    Like

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